ADHS Newsletter No. 208 JANUARY, 2003

Items of interest

. AGM 18 May. Guest speaker Pearl Collins, compiler of book Dear Aunt Emma.

. Avoca Mail excerpts: Accident to John and Charles Rowles (24/10/1879); shooting accident Leersen (26/5/1885); railway employee John Bartlett (20/10/1876); missing child James Watson (17/5/1878); riding accident Thomas Paten (19/2/1878)

. Electors who voted in the 1899 Victorian Federal Poll from Moonambel, Warrenmang and Mountain Hut: ADAMS William A. Grazier HUNTER James, snr. Farmer BANNISTER Joseph W. Collector HUNTER Robert Farmer BONSOR William, jnr. Miner KNIGHT Thomas Miner BONSOR William, snr. Miner LITHGOW Alexander Farmer BORBRIDGE Henry Farmer McIVER John Constable CASTLEMAN Charles, jnr. Blacksmith MANNDER Joseph Miner CRICK Jock Butcher MOONEY Thomas Farmer DATE Frederick Tinsmith MOYLE William T. Hotelkeeper DOHERTY Hugh Farmer MURDOCH Charles Farmer D’ORIVAL Charles Miner MURGATROYD John Soap Factorer DUNELL George Miner SKIDMORE Thomas Miner DUNELL Richard Farmer SMITH William F. Soap Boiler FITZGERALD James Storekeeper STEWART George Ostler FORDHAM William Miner STUART Davis M. Baker FREEMAN William Teacher SUTHERLAND Donald Miner GODDARD Edward Farmer TORNEY Patrick, snr. Farmer GOOCH William Farmer TURNER Henry Miner GOOCH William J. Farmer WHITTICOMBE Samuel Miner GREEN Charles Farmer WHITTICOMBE William Miner GREENE William Farmer WILLIAMS Daniel, senr. Farmer HOLMES Samuel Carrier HUDSON William Storekeeper, ALEXANDER George Farmer PEACOCK George Farmer ANDERSON Robert Farmer Middle Creek ANDERSON Samuel Farmer PEACOCK James Farmer ANDREWS Emanuel L. Farmer Middle Creek CAREY David Farmer PEACOCK Ralph Farmer CAREY Thomas Miner Middle Creek HARDY James B. Farmer PUNTON Alexander Farmer SANDERS Colston Farmer WILLIAMS Walter Farmer Moonambel, IMPEY Thomas, snr. Butcher SCHMIDT Peter Engine Driver

New Year Greetings - With this first newsletter for 2003, we send New Year greetings to all our members, near and far. We look forward to another year of interesting Society activities and wish you all great success as you gather information on your family history.

End-of-Year Get-together, 2002 - A very pleasant afternoon was enjoyed by all who attended our Christmas get-together held at the Court House on Sunday, 17th November. Tables were suitably and attractively decorated and the exchange of small Christmas gifts added to the festive spirit. We thank Len and Betty Fleming for the donation of a large tin of shortbread which was raffled on the day, the lucky winner being Marj. Partridge. A very interesting and pleasant surprise was the arrival of a group of choristers who entertained us with their excellent unaccompanied singing, their items ranging from Whispering Hope to Christmas carols. This newly formed group call themselves The Lost Chords and had only been together for three months when they sang for us. However, their title greatly belies their talents as no discordant notes were detected in their harmonious renditions of the songs in their repertoire. Your Editor is very partial to unaccompanied choral harmony and particularly enjoyed this surprise concert. We wish the group every success as they continue to gain pleasure themselves from singing together, and, in so doing, bring pleasure to others who attend their performances.

Garage Sale and General Meeting, Saturday, 15th February - The Society’s activities for 2003 will commence with the annual Garage Sale to be held at the Court House on Saturday, 15th February, commencing at 9 a.m. As this is our main fund-raiser, your support is encouraged and there are several ways to do this. Donations of your unwanted bits and pieces can be left at the Court House or, for members who live in Melbourne, please ring Margaret and Harry Oulton on 9596 2500 to make suitable arrangements for the collection of your goods. Help will be required to price the goods in readiness for sale, whilst assistance on the stalls and donations of cakes and produce will also be appreciated on the day. Then bring your friends and come along – and buy!

Please note that, after due discussion, it has been decided no electrical goods will be accepted for sale.

Our first General Meeting for the year will follow the Garage Sale, commencing at 2 p.m. at the Court House.

Visit to Werribee Park - Plans are well in hand for this proposed trip to Werribee Park to be held on Sunday, 16th March, to see the mansion and the rose garden. Full details will appear in the next newsletter. Meantime, it is important for local folk to get their name on the list of those interested in going, so that a suitable bus can be booked. Please contact any of the executives as soon as possible if you have not already expressed your interest in this outing.

April Meeting Day - As our April meeting day falls on Easter Sunday this year, it has been decided to meet on the following Sunday, the 27th April.

Speaker for our A.G.M. - Our member, Pearl Collins, has kindly agreed to be the guest speaker at our Annual General Meeting which will be held on Sunday, 18th May. Pearl will be known to many as the compiler of the book, Dear Aunt Emma, which comprises letters written by members of the Stavely family over many years and kept by the late Miss Emma Stavely, of Maryborough. These letters were only a part of the memorabilia and family heirlooms stored in an old trunk at Emma’s home which are now seeing the light of day again, firstly through Dear Aunt Emma, and now through a new book, An Unlettered Girl: Her Life on the Goldfields, by Patricia Stavely Baird, who is Pearl’s cousin and custodian of the trunk of family treasures.

Situation Becoming Vacant - In 1986, Helen Harris approached me to produce the newsletter whilst she was overseas for several months. However, as so often happens, this temporary arrangement became a permanent one and I have now enjoyed almost seventeen years of meeting the monthly challenge of keeping members informed of the Society’s activities through Pyrenees Pioneers. I feel it is now time for me to stand aside and wish to relinquish this position as from the AGM in May. The newsletter is the means of holding this Society together as we have members in all States and also overseas. We would be delighted to hear from anyone interested in carrying on this important task.

Welcome - A warm welcome to the Society is extended to the following new members :-

Mr. Ivan and Mrs. Ruth SPARGO, of Redbank.

Mr. Bill and Mrs. Lesley HUNTER, of Elmhurst, who are researching the DUVANEL and BRERETON families.

Two Leaves Have Gently Fallen - The Society has been saddened to learn of the deaths of two of our members in recent weeks. Miss Nancy Friend passed away at the Stawell Hospital on 31st December, 2002. Descended from the Hodgetts and Friend families of the Landsborough area, Nancy was the daughter of John and Florence Friend. Nancy was a loyal and active supporter of our Society from the time she joined in 1985. The funeral service was held at the Landsborough Uniting Church on 2nd January, 2003, followed by burial at the Landsborough Cemetery.

Miss Elizabeth McKechnie, of Castlemaine, who died recently, joined the Society in 1995, and was a descendant of pioneer David Anderson, who built the Burnbank Inn in Lexton’s very early days. We recall her attendance, at our Christmas get-together in Toll Bar Park in December, 1995, and her great interest in the walk round historic Lexton conducted that afternoon by Margaret Oulton.

We extend deepest condolences at this time to those nearest and dearest to both Nancy and Elizabeth.

New Book - Geoff Howe has published a book, Words of War, which is based on letters from, and newspaper interviews with more than forty soldier from Sydney’s inner west who fought in the Boer War. Included is material on the NSW Lancers, NSW Mounted Infantry, NSW A Battery, NSW Medical Corps, Fighting Charlie Cox, Lieut. Russell Watson of Pretoria fame, and a soldier who fought at Elands River. This 124-page illustrated book costs $20, plus $4.50 p&p, and is supported by the Department of Veterans’ Affairs under Their Service Heritage programme, and the Burwood (NSW) RSL Sub-Branch. It is available from Geoff Howe at 2F Stiles Street, Croydon Park, NSW 2133 and cheques should be made out to Geoff Howe. His phone number is (02) 9744 0709.

More details can be found at www.sydneyhistory.com.au

West Gippsland Ancestors - Were any of your forebears in West Gippsland before 1925? If you would like them to be included in a book to be released in 2004, please contact the West Gippsland Genealogical Society Inc., PO Box 225, Warragul, Vic. 3820. To obtain an entry form, please send a stamped and self-addressed A4 envelope to the above address, or you may ring June Harvey on (03) 5625 1589.

Discoveries, Deadends and Databases are the themes for the 10th Australasian Congress on Genealogy and Heraldry to be held at the Melbourne Convention Centre from 23rd to 27th April, 2003. It is being organised by the Genealogical Society of Victoria, under the auspices of the Australasian Federation of Family History Organisations. The special guest at the gala dinner will be Shane Howard. Lectures will cover many topics which may well help researchers who have ‘struck a brick wall’. For full information, contact the GSV on (03) 9670 7033, Fax (03) 9670 4490 or e-mail gsv@gsv.org.au

Naming Patterns of Children - Family historians beginning their search of records will come to understand the following naming pattern, very popular in Scotland and, to some extent, in England, which can be a guide in identifying a family :

Males Named after Females Named after

First born son Father’s father 1st born daughter Mother’s mother

2nd born son Mother’s father 2nd born daughter Father’s mother

3rd born son Father 3rd born daughter Mother

4th born son Father’s eldest brother 4th born daughter Mother’s eldest sister

5th born son Father’s 2nd eldest brother 5th born daughter Mother’s 2nd eldest sister or mother’s oldest brother or father’s oldest sister

(From "Family Ties", the journal of the Bundaberg Genealogical Assocn. Inc.)

Accidents of Yesteryear - The following stories are from a scrap-book compiled by Dorothy Robinson of reports of various accidents which appeared in local newspapers of yesteryear:-

From the "Avoca Mail", 24th October, 1879 :

John and Charles Rowles – "A serious accident happened at Maryborough on Wednesday to two young men, brothers, named John and Charles Rowles. They had just bottomed a shaft between 20 ft and 30 ft deep, about a mile from Maryborough. Charles was in a bucket being lowered by his brother John, when by some means the latter let go the handle of the windlass, which the weight of Charles caused it to revolve rapidly, striking John on the forehead, cutting it open for about 3 inches. The shock of the blow caused the barrel of the windlass to jump out of the cross-trees and fall down the shaft on the top of the man in the shaft, who had fallen to the bottom. The handle of the windlass went through his leg at the knee, pinning him to the ground.

John was nearly senseless, and unable to assist his brother, but managed to attract the attention of some person near, who came to his assistance, and rescued his brother. John’s wound was dressed at his residence, which is near the scene of the accident, while his brother was taken to the hospital, when a consultation was held by the house surgeon, Mr. Dunn, and Dr. Jackson. It was thought advisable to try to save the leg."

From the "Avoca Mail", 26th May, 1885 :

Shooting Accident - "A peculiar accident happened at Number Two Creek on Sunday to a lad named Leersen, 16 years of age. The boy, it appears, had seen a kangaroo and his gun being loaded with shot, he discharged it so as to enable him to load it with a conical ball. He put the powder in and then placed the cap on the nipple letting the hammer down, and then proceeded to put the ball in, but it got fixed half way and, in endeavouring to ram it down, the concussion lifted the hammer which fell on the cap, discharging the gun. The ball was blown clean through Leersen’s hand, splintering some of the bones. The sufferer was immediately conveyed to the Amherst Hospital."

From the "Avoca Mail, 13th October, 1876:

Railway Accident – "An accident occurred on the railway line yesterday by which a man had all his fingers taken off his left hand, another man had his ankle sprained, a cow was killed and considerable damage was done to several ballast trucks. The engine was entering Moonlight Flat when a cow which had been standing by the line tried to cross and was run over. The engine, tender and one truck passed safely over the obstruction, but the second and third trucks came off the rails, the two coming together with such force that the two fore wheels of one truck came through the bottom of the other. The men on the trucks jumped off and, in doing so, one named Charlton sprained his ankle. A man named John Bartlett was riding on one of the trucks which did not leave the line, and grasping the edge of his truck, had the fingers of his left hand taken off while passing the disabled trucks. The sufferers were cared for by Mr. Gartly, who took them to the hospital, where their injuries were promptly attended to by Dr. Dunn."

From the "Avoca Mail", 20th October, 1876:

"The promise made that the unfortunate man, Bartlett, who was hurt on the railway last week, should have some light employment found for him, has been promptly redeemed. Bartlett is not yet out of the hospital, but we have been informed that his wife was yesterday placed in the care of one of the gates on the line, pending her husband’s recovery. We understand that this really charitable act is due to the thoughtful kindness of Mr. Greene, the Inspecting Engineer, and reflects great credit upon him and also the department for so promptly adopting his recommendation."

From the "Avoca Mail", 17th May, 1878:

Missing Child – "The neighbourhood of Lamplough has been thrown into a state of alarm by the loss of a child named James Watson, only four years old. The little fellow strayed from his home about ten o’clock yesterday morning, and although every effort has been made to trace him, recovery had not been reported last evening. The reservoir was dragged by the police, and school children scoured the bush, and ten search parties went out in as many different directions, but without finding any traces of the child. We hear that Constable Shanklin has gone out to Lamplough this morning, and if the little wanderer has not been found since he left at a late hour last night, an extended search will be made today. As may be imagined, the parents are almost distracted by the uncertainty of the child’s fate, and the knowledge of the sufferings he has endured if living, through hunger and exposed to the severe frost of last night. (Just as we were going to press this afternoon, a report reached us that the boy had been found this morning near Amphitheatre.)"

From the "Avoca Mail",19th February, 1878:

Riding Accident – "A young lad named Thomas Paten, about eleven years of age, a visitor to Avoca from New South Wales, met with an accident on Saturday afternoon, by which he suffered a broken arm. The lad, in the company with some others, was riding a pony belonging to Mr. Buhlert in the neighbourhood of the Avoca Lead, when the animal became frightened and bolted, through some cur-dogs barking at its heels, and the boy was thrown, his foot hanging in the stirrup, by which he was dragged for some distance. Owing to the pony’s hoofs striking the lad as it galloped, young Paten might have been killed if it had not been for the sagacious and prompt assistance rendered by Mr. Buhlert’s Newfoundland dog which generally accompanies the children in their excursions. The dog, immediately on seeing the boy thrown, started in pursuit of the pony, and endeavoured to stop it by pulling at the stirrup. Failing in this, he ran to the pony’s head, caught the reins, and then quickly brought him to a standstill, holding the animal until the boy disengaged himself from the saddle. Mr. George Gouge, who had witnessed the accident, had also started in pursuit of the pony, and afterwards brought the lad into Avoca, where his injuries were treated by Dr. McMahon. He is now progressing favourably towards recovery."

FEDERATION - There are still a few areas to cover of the listing of names shown on the Electoral Roll of the wider Avoca district who voted at the Victorian Federal Election in 1899, so we will continue for a short time yet :-

M O O N A M B E L

ADAMS William A. Grazier HUNTER James, snr. Farmer

BANNISTER Joseph W. Collector HUNTER Robert Farmer

BONSOR William, jnr. Miner KNIGHT Thomas Miner

BONSOR William, snr. Miner LITHGOW Alexander Farmer

BORBRIDGE Henry Farmer McIVER John Constable

CASTLEMAN Charles, jnr. Blacksmith MANNDER Joseph Miner

CRICK Jock Butcher MOONEY Thomas Farmer

DATE Frederick Tinsmith MOYLE William T. Hotelkeeper

DOHERTY Hugh Farmer MURDOCH Charles Farmer

D’ORIVAL Charles Miner MURGATROYD John Soap Factorer

DUNELL George Miner SKIDMORE Thomas Miner

DUNELL Richard Farmer SMITH William F. Soap Boiler

FITZGERALD James Storekeeper STEWART George Ostler

FORDHAM William Miner STUART Davis M. Baker

FREEMAN William Teacher SUTHERLAND Donald Miner

GODDARD Edward Farmer TORNEY Patrick, snr. Farmer

GOOCH William Farmer TURNER Henry Miner

GOOCH William J. Farmer WHITTICOMBE Samuel Miner

GREEN Charles Farmer WHITTICOMBE William Miner

GREENE William Farmer WILLIAMS Daniel, senr. Farmer

HOLMES Samuel Carrier

HUDSON William Storekeeper

W A R R E N M A N G

ALEXANDER George Farmer PEACOCK George Farmer

ANDERSON Robert Farmer Middle Creek

ANDERSON Samuel Farmer PEACOCK James Farmer

ANDREWS Emanuel L. Farmer Middle Creek

CAREY David Farmer PEACOCK Ralph Farmer

CAREY Thomas Miner Middle Creek

HARDY James B. Farmer PUNTON Alexander Farmer

SANDERS Colston Farmer

WILLIAMS Walter Farmer Moonambel

M O U N T A I N H U T

IMPEY Thomas, snr. Butcher SCHMIDT Peter Engine Driver

Thought for Today –

You will never ‘find’ time for anything. If you want time, you must make it.

Charles Buxton, English author (1823-1871)